The Swedish massage technique involves soft and long kneading strokes along with light, rhythmic, tapping strokes on the top layers of the muscles, generally in the direction of the heart. It is typically used for relaxation, relief of muscular tension, and improvement of circulation and range of motion. Other techniques include circular pressure applied by the hands and palms, firm kneading, percussion-like tapping, bending, and stretching.
Sports massage is a form of bodywork geared toward participants in athletics. It is used to help prevent injuries, to prepare the body for athletic activity and maintain it in optimal condition, and to help athletes recover from workouts and injuries. Sports massage has three basic forms: pre-event massage, post-event massage, and maintenance massage.
Reflexology is actually an ancient practice. It’s been practiced for thousands of years in such places as China, Egypt, and India. It was first brought to North America by Dr. William Fitzgerald, who was an ear, nose and throat specialist. His first stab at Western reflexology was called “zone therapy”; this was around the early 1900s. From there, Eunice Ingham, a physiotherapist, picked up the pieces and developed techniques and a body map of the foot, which later became known as reflexology. In modern days, reflexology is increasingly becoming a popular form of holistic therapy.

The whole Swedish experience is also a potential stress reliever, which is a benefit unto itself. Plus, it can improve blood flow, delivering more oxygen to cells. A lesser-known benefit—moisturized, glowing skin—results from the application of massage oils. Many therapists prefer to use sweet almond oil because it absorbs slowly into the skin, yet doesn’t leave clients feeling like they’re covered in grease. Other favorite oils include grapeseed (non-greasy, no smell) and jojoba oil (easily absorbed, mixes well with aromatherapy oils).

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Whether you have temporary pain, are suffering from a longtime chronic condition, or just love to feel good, deep tissue massage and massage therapy can bring you lasting relief. Science tells us that deep tissue massage both feels great and is a known medical solution. In fact, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health says deep tissue massage is proven to encourage healing and relieve pain and discomfort related to health challenges such as cancer, depression, chronic headaches, chronic neck or back pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, and more. Deep tissue massage is frequently used for relieving stress, managing pain, breaking down scar tissue, relieving muscle tension and improving health. Deep tissue massage has also been shown to be beneficial in reducing high blood pressure.

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The physiological effects are a bit of a moot point: if the pressure doesn’t suit you, you’re not likely to continue with the therapy. The exception is the patient who is willing to put up with intense pain long enough to find out if there appears to be a therapeutic effect afterwards, which there may be. But that judgement call is often made without much knowledge of whether or not the pain is really justified. BACK TO TEXT

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Known for the deep techniques and use of trigger point therapy, muscle energy techniques and muscle stripping, this massage is for those who have more chronic pain and tension. This treatment is suitable for releasing tight, strained muscles and helping with postural deviations, range of motion and whiplash syndrome as well as dealing with the everyday stresses of work and life.
Sore/aching muscles: Muscle soreness on the treated area is a common side effect following massage therapy. It is normal because the muscles worked with during a deep tissue massage may not have been touched or manipulated often, if ever. Soreness may feel in the days after like a good workout. It may feel mild or moderate and should fade over the days following treatment.
Contrary to its name, Swedish massage is neither originated in Sweden nor was it created by a Swede gymnast called Peter Henry Ling. There is much debate regarding the origin of the massage; therefore, it is highly common to mistake the origination between either Peter Henry Ling or the Dutch practitioner Johan Georg, who is with verified credibility considered as the man who systemized basic massage movements into what we know it as today; Swedish massage.
“Every individual has a physical body, mind, emotions and spirit - which is also known as the vital force. It is this vital force which supplies energy to every cell in your body. Life cannot be sustained without it,” explains Nancy. “The Classical Homeopathy approach to health and wellness focuses intensely upon each person’s individual vitality and strength, and unique vital force,” she continues. “Once your vitality is restored on this energetic level, healing begins from the inside out.”
Deep Tissue massages are designed to focus on a specific problem, usually something along the lines of chronic muscle pain, limited mobility, tennis elbow, etc. Cathy Wong explains that according to Consumer Reports magazine, at least 34,000 people claimed that Deep Tissue massages were more effective in relieving osteoarthritis pain than physical therapy, chiropractic, acupuncture or over-the-counter drugs. It is also especially effective in easing fibromyalgia pain, usually giving clients an improved range of motion immediately following treatment.
Any tender or sensitive areas of the body are dealt with extra caution and are more commonly massaged in a soft, relaxing manner; whereas, massage intensity is increased for tension-prone sectors such as the lower back or the shoulders. Customized lotions or essential oil mixtures are also created by the massage therapist after evaluating the skin-type and body assessment of each client.

Quick muscle knot orientation: Muscle knots — myofascial “trigger points” — are a factor in most of the world’s aches and pains. Their biology is still mostly mysterious: conventional wisdom says they are tiny spasms, but they might also be a more pure neurological problem. Regardless, they can cause strong pain that often spreads in confusing patterns, and they grow like weeds around other painful problems and injuries, making them quite interesting and tricky. Although they are well known to many specialists and researchers, most doctors and therapists know little about them, so misdiagnosis is epidemic. For more information about how trigger points might be involved in your own medical history, see PainScience.com’s best-selling tutorial:

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