For me, the opportunity to work with individuals who have such an awareness of their bodies is exceptional. You and the athlete are a team. Locating an area of dysfunction, aiding in the relief or facilitating improvement in the area, then watching the athlete go out and perform well is uplifting. The environment is charged. What’s more, learning from health care professionals while teaching them how massage fits into overall health and wellness is just plain awesome! 
Whenever athletes exercise heavily, their muscles suffer microtraumas. Small amounts of swelling occur in the muscle because of tiny tears. Post-event sports massage helps reduce the swelling caused by microtraumas; loosens tired, stiff muscles; helps maintain flexibility; promotes blood flow to the muscle to remove lactic acid and waste build-up; and reduces cramping. In addition, post-event massage helps speed the athlete's recovery time and alleviates pulls, strains, and soreness.
Rubbing deep muscles and relieving pressures has been shown to improve blood flow. New research further explains there is an improvement in circulation in both athletes and non-exercisers, suggesting the benefit beyond the realm of exercise and correlated muscle injury and soreness. Blood pressure and heart rate can also be lowered following deep tissue massage.
According to Robert Noah Calvert, author of The History of Massage, what we now call Swedish massage was never part of Ling’s movement system. Swedish massage, as Calvert asserts, is defined by its system of stroking, kneading, and other bodily manipulations. These he credits to a Dutch practitioner, Johann Georg Mezger, who lived and worked in the late 19th century. As a result, what Americans know as Swedish massage is called “classic massage” throughout most of Europe.
Practices resembling reflexology may have existed in previous historical periods. Similar practices have been documented in the histories of China and Egypt.[9] Reflexology was introduced to the United States in 1913 by William H. Fitzgerald, M.D. (1872–1942), an ear, nose, and throat specialist, and Edwin F. Bowers. Fitzgerald claimed that applying pressure had an anesthetic effect on other areas of the body.[16][17] It was modified in the 1930s and 1940s by Eunice D. Ingham (1889–1974), a nurse and physiotherapist.[18][19] Ingham claimed that the feet and hands were especially sensitive, and mapped the entire body into "reflexes" on the feet, renaming "zone therapy" reflexology.[20] "Modern reflexologists use Ingham's methods, or similar techniques developed by the reflexologist Laura Norman."[9]
Muscles are layered on top of each other and over lap. Some muscles are right on the surface like your rectus abdominis (six pack ab muscles), and some are much deeper in the body like your Psoas muscle (deep hip flexor). So a DTM implies that the therapist is not just working on the superficial musculature, but reaching layers of muscle and fascia (connective tissue) further below the surface.
Most deep tissue massages normally focus on major muscle groups — such as the neck or lower back — along with joints and tendons that are susceptible to straining or injuries. Certain areas of the body that tend to tense up in times of stress, including the shoulders, neck and hips, can often benefit the most from this type of deep manipulation. Many people consider “sports massages” to be a form of deep tissue massage, which involves physical treatment primarily to neuromusculoskeletal systems to treat pain and disability, improve muscle recovery and joint mobilization, and prevent injuries.
Sore/aching muscles: Muscle soreness on the treated area is a common side effect following massage therapy. It is normal because the muscles worked with during a deep tissue massage may not have been touched or manipulated often, if ever. Soreness may feel in the days after like a good workout. It may feel mild or moderate and should fade over the days following treatment.
Muscles have a natural reflex to resist pain. When a muscle thinks it's about to be injured, this reflex is triggered. When too much pressure is applied during a massage, the muscle or group of muscles will naturally resist force by tightening further. This is the opposite effect of what a massage is all about. Effective massages relax and release areas of tension.

Douglasville Douglas 30134 Georgia GA 33.7606 -84.7477


The light-touch, free massages often offered at finish line festivals can help calm the nervous system by allowing the body to commence its natural repair state quicker, explains Rosemarie Rotenberger, an orthopedic massage therapist in Mertztown, Pennsylvania. And  Denunzio says that racers can schedule a recovery-focused sports massage within several hours up to 48 hours after an event, although she recommends massage newbies wait three to four days, as they may be too sore within the first few days fully benefit from (and appreciate) the experience.

Like massages, chiropractic care can be beneficial for lowering pain and improving recovery. It’s also been shown to lower stress, headaches and more. One way that chiropractors help treat pain is by lowering mechanical compression and irritation of spinal joints, which can send nerve signals throughout the body that increase inflammation and irritation.

Tate Pickens 30177 Georgia GA 34.4027 -84.3785


The day-to-day weight we carry in the form of stress, tension, or physical injury impacts our mind, body, and spirit, often in profound ways. Massagetique was created to help lift those burdens and encourage people to relax, feel good, and heal. By connecting those in need of healing with a massage provider, we hope to contribute to a healthier, happier, and more peaceful world. Learn More About Massagetique

Decatur DeKalb 30032 Georgia GA 33.7408 -84.2632


Massage techniques also include Petrissage, or kneading, which is designed to release toxins from the muscles by lifting, separating, and rolling them. Gentle pressure is used to compress and relax the tissue and enhance circulation. Another technique, Tapotement, involves tapping the muscles with a percussive stroke. The side of the hand, fingers, or palm may be used to release tension and cramping. Many therapists also incorporate vibration, a later technique, which involves the therapist centering his or her hands on the back of a limb and shaking them briskly for several seconds to release tension, encourage circulation, and help muscles to contract.
@Gayle- At Athletico we do not bill insurance directly for Massage Services, unless they are a part of your Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy treatment plan. On its own, Massage is fee-for-service. We would be more than happy to provide you with a receipt that you could use to submit for reimbursement. We have a Massage Therapist in Glenview and in Buffalo Grove- they are both awesome!

Jonesboro Clayton 30236 Georgia GA 33.5242 -84.359


The reason the Pressure Question exists is that it’s hard for patients to tell the difference between nasty pain that might be a necessary part of therapy, and ugly pain that is just abusive. Not everything that hurts is therapeutic, but not every therapeutic procedure is painless! How can we tell if an intense massage technique is therapeutic or not?
Using this chart, you can perform something like pain relief for the shoulders. The proper technique here would be to find on the foot the part of the spine that is level with the shoulders (from bottom of big toe to where the ball of the foot finishes), locate the part of the spine that is level with the shoulder area (from the base of big toe to where ball of foot finishes), thumb walk this part on the spine area up and down for several minutes, and then thumb walk the entire shoulder area.
Muscle injury and soreness are an occupational hazard when it comes to athletics. Coaches, athletes, and professionals in the field of sports medicine have found that massage can provide several benefits to the body such as increased blood flow, reduced muscle tension, and an increased sense of well-being. The majority of research on psychological effects of massage has concluded that massage produces positive effects on recovery and post-exercise massage has been shown to reduce the severity of muscle soreness. While there is no research focusing specifically on the benefits of deep tissue massage on muscle rehabilitation, studies find that massage therapy, in general, can help with performance, recovery, and muscle injury prevention.8

Alpharetta Fulton 30009 Georgia GA 34.077 -84.3033

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