Athletes tend to know their bodies fairly well, so information presented to the therapist seems to be better. Compared to the general client, the athlete is also in good shape and is concerned about getting back to the field of play as soon as possible. Some athletes have an obsessive compulsive behavior about their sport. This generally makes them very compliant with the therapists’ recommendations. 

To put it bluntly, it’s not clear that massage has any musculoskeletal benefits at all. It probably does, but mostly quite temporary and highly unpredictable. There’s not nearly enough science, and therapists are hopelessly biased assessing their own efficacy. See Does Massage Therapy Work? A review of the science of massage therapy … such as it is. BACK TO TEXT

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Tapotement is the percussive technique where the therapist uses a cupping or hacking technique. This is a great way to finish a massage – it’s a little stimulating and helps to wake up the body so we can get off the table and on with our day. (Don’t hesitate to request it from your therapist if they do not do it on their own! However, if they have bad rhythm, they may not be as good as a talented bongo player!).
During the 1990s, I observed at least seven foot reflexologists at work during health expositions. In most cases, the process appeared to be an ordinary prolonged foot massage with little communication between the practitioners and their clients. But at one exhibit, the practitioners claimed that they could reduce stress, cleanse the body of toxins, increase circulation, assist in weight loss, and improve the health of organs throughout the body. On another occasion, I underwent a 15-minute session in which the practitioner felt my foot for diagnostic purposes and then massaged it for "therapeutic" purposes. During the previous year, I had had severe shoulder pain caused by an inflamed tendon that was rubbing against a bony surface inside my left shoulder joint. Thorough medical evaluation had determined that the appropriate treatment was arthroscopic surgery in which a drill is used to shave the bony area that was impinging on the tendon. The reflexologist claimed that he could detect the shoulder problem by feeling my left foot, that it was caused by stress, and that pressing on my foot—perhaps for a few sessions—could solve the problem. His "treatment," which lasted about 10 minutes, consisted of massaging the foot and from time to time, pressing hard on the ball of my foot, a procedure that was quite painful. The "treatment," of course, did absolutely nothing to help my shoulder. A few months later, I had the surgery, which cured the problem immediately and permanently.
We recently received an email from a representative of Modern Reflexology asking if they could advertise their website on ours and offering to pay. Of course, we don’t accept advertising. But I was puzzled as to why they approached us and what they thought was science-based about reflexology. I was intrigued enough to visit their website to learn what “modern” reflexology was all about. I learned about a lot of specific claims I hadn’t heard before, but I found no science whatsoever. By writing this article, I am in a sense giving them the advertising that they asked for; but it will be negative publicity, not positive. Old adage: Don’t wish too hard for what you want; you might get it.

Did you know that the bottom of your feet could affect what's going on in other areas of your body? On each foot there are over 7,000 nerve endings called reflexes that correspond to every organ and system within your body. By pressing on these reflex points, you stimulate the nervous system and open energy pathways that may be blocked or congested.

Decatur 30089 Georgia GA 33.7749 -84.3046


A typical reflexology session runs from thirty to sixty minutes. Shoes and socks are removed, and the client is made comfortable, usually by sitting or reclining. Some reflexologists offer a foot bath at the beginning of the session, however, no lotions or oils are used. Pressure is applied in thumb-and-finger “walking” patterns, resulting in gentle stretching and massaging of specific zones of the hands and feet that are thought to correspond to body organs. Simple self-care instructions may be discussed at the completion of the session.

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Since reflexology is not recognized by law, no formal training is required to practice reflexology or call oneself a reflexologist. However, some nurses and massage therapists offer reflexology as part of their licensed practice. Some courses are accredited for continuing education for nurses and massage therapists. The most widely publicized training source is probably the International Institute of Reflexology, of St. Petersburg, Florida, which claims to have 25,000 members worldwide [9]. Its seminar on the "Original Ingham Method of Foot Reflexology" are taught by Ingham's nephew, Dwight Byers. Its "Certified Member" status requires 200 hours of instruction plus passage of written and practical tests. As far as I know, this certification process has neither legal nor medical recognition. The Institute's Web site states:
SoJo Spa Club offers clients who book SPA services one hour of complimentary access to our amenities before and after all appointments for services totaling $175 or more per individual. If you intend on using our spa facilities, we ask that you arrive early accordingly. Those who wish to extend their stay beyond that time are welcome to purchase a general admission ticket for 50% off.
As this was my first massage, it was a bit surreal to undress all except for my panties. Rosalyn worked from top to bottom, explaining where my knots were (in my shoulders, arms, and lower back) while talking about her childhood history. I never thought that arms could be massaged, but let me tell you that it made a tremendous difference for the amount of time I spent in front of the computer analyzing data! She massaged my head, neck, back, arms, shoulders, buttocks, legs, and feet. She goes the extra way in pulling your arm away to stretch out the joints, and she also works you like a puppet to get the maximum stretch and popping of your spine. It was a bit scary, but pleasant! If you're looking for deep pressure, this is definitely it. I had to stop her kneads on my calves, as the pain was a bit much. She attributed her strength to working out. I was impressed. Since then I've been a regular of hers for almost ten years now.
"Art’s passion, teaching expertise, and therapeutic knowledge blend beautifully in this user-friendly text. Every somatic therapist will gain valuable insights for energizing their practice and enhancing skills. The book is obviously a labor of love, and as the great author, poet, and artist John Ruskin once stated, 'When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.'"—Erik Dalton, Ph.D., Developer of the Myoskeletal Alignment Techniques and founder of the Freedom From Pain Institute"Art Riggs is masterful at teaching and explaining deep bodywork. We unreservedly recommend his materials in our workshops, and his updated Deep Tissue Massage will be an indispensable aid to practitioners, teachers, schools, and students."—Til Luchau, Certified Advanced Rolfer, Faculty of the Rolf Institute of Structural Integration and Director and Lead Instructor of Advanced-Trainings.com“Art Riggs has created a superb teaching tool for the classroom and a matchless clinical reference manual. His book captures the background context and specific applications of deep tissue work in a word and picture, while conveying the essence and importance of attitude and approach.”—Keith Eric Grant, Ph.D., NCTMB, Research physicist and director of the McKinnon Institute Sports & Dip Tissue Program

Tucker DeKalb 30085 Georgia GA 33.8913 -84.0746


Recovery. Therapeutic massage helps the body recover from the stresses of strenuous exercise, and facilitates the rebuilding phase of conditioning. The physiological benefits of massage include improved blood and lymph circulation, muscle relaxation, and general relaxation. These, in turn, lead to removal of waste products and better cell nutrition, normalization and greater elasticity of tissues, deactivation of trigger points, and faster healing of injuries. It all adds up to relief from soreness and stiffness, better flexibility, and less potential for future injury.

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Cancer. Used as a complement to traditional, Western medicine, massage can promote relaxation and reduce cancer symptoms or side effects of treatment. It may help reduce pain, swelling, fatigue, nausea, or depression, for example, or improve the function of your immune system. However, there are specific areas that a massage therapist should avoid in a cancer patient, as well as times when massage should be avoided altogether. Talk to your doctor before getting massage therapy if you have cancer.

Another study compared the effects of foot reflexology, simple massage, and conversation on 130 patients who had undergone abdominal gynecologic surgery under full anesthesia. The patients were asked how they felt, and data were recorded on general condition, pain intensity, movement of the bowels, urination, and sleep, from the day before the operation until until the tenth day afterward. Simple massage turned out to be a relaxing, positive experience, whereas foot reflexology had various effects, some of which were negative. The researchers concluded that foot reflexology is not effective in acute, abdominal postsurgical situations in gynecology and can occasionally trigger abdominal pain [15].
A deep tissue massage is the more sophisticated and intensive parent of a Swedish massage. Deep tissue massages are often known for the pressure that they utilize, but it’s what that pressure does that makes these massages a standout for people who are looking to address special concerns. Since this massage is given with firmer pressure, it’s capable of affecting deeper layers of muscle and connective tissues. Adhesions and scar tissue from old injuries or overuse of a muscle are released, helping you improve your ability to live your life to the fullest without nagging dull aches or stiffness. 

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"I loved the program and what it had to offer,” he stated. “I knew then that I found my niche.” Victor graduated in 2005 and within one month landed a job as a massage therapist. “Swedish Institute was instrumental in laying the foundation for my career as a massage therapist,” he said. “The curriculum gave me all the tools I needed to be successful in the field.”

It’s important to be open with your massage therapist about the level of pressure and discomfort you wish to endure. This may be different for certain areas and throughout the massage, feel free to communicate with your massage therapist before and during the massage. Some massage therapists find pain to be counterproductive to the process and expect you to speak up if the pain is too much.
Due to our vast experience working as sports massage therapists in Norwich, you can rest assured that you are in good hands with us at The Norfolk Clinic. We have a passion for what we do and this shows in all of the sports massage treatments that we offer to clients throughout Norwich and the surrounding areas. This is one of the main reasons why we believe we should be your first and only port of call for a sports massage, anywhere in the Norwich area.
However, since having the feet or hands rubbed is an enjoyable and relaxing experience for most people, there is little doubt that hand and foot reflexology can promote stress relief and a sense of well being in much the same way as any other form of massage. This therapy may be an especially useful complementary treatment for neuropathy of the legs, feet and toes. It can also be useful for sore hands and feet after a workout, running or taking a long walk.
According to the Neuromuscular Therapy Center, NMT is one type of deep massage technique that focuses on applying manual therapy to soft tissue with “quasi-static pressure” in order to stimulate skeletal striated muscle. (17) In addition to massaging a painful or inflamed muscle, the area around the affected muscle that normally supports it is also massaged in order to release tension. NMT therapists often focus on several factors that can add to muscle or tissue dysfunctions, including joint pathologies, postural positioning, disruptive habits of use, nutritional components, emotional well-being, allergies and neurotoxins.

Dacula Gwinnett 30019 Georgia GA 33.9883 -83.8795

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