Thai massage, also called Thai yoga massage, combines acupressure and assisted yoga postures. Thai massage is based on the flow of energy through the body and focuses on energy lines called “sen.” It doesn’t use oils or lotions and, instead of rubbing muscles, the massage therapist compresses, pulls, stretches and rocks the recipient’s body to promote the flow of energy through these sen. In this form of massage therapy, practitioners use their hands, knees, legs and feet to apply deep muscle compression and stretch the body. It’s often performed on a mat on the floor instead of on a massage table. Like most forms of massage, Thai massage is used to relieve stress, improve range of motion and enhance flexibility. Some people also use Thai massage to address a range of health issues, including:  
In Sweden, "Swedish massage" is simply known as "classic massage". And that is exactly what it is -- a classic treatment which represents the western standard for massage.  The five main techniques used in Swedish massage -- stroking and gliding; kneading; rubbing; tapping or pounding; vibration -- are probably what spring to mind when you think about a "typical" massage.

Oils: The base oil should be a vegetable oil, cold pressed, unrefined, and free of additives. These oils contain such nutrients as vitamins and minerals in addition to fatty acids. They do not clog the pores as mineral oils often do. Essential (aromatic) oils may be added to provide additional relaxation or other therapeutic effects. Massage oil should be warmed in the therapist's hands before it is applied to the client's skin.

How It Works: Beginning by laying face down (or prone position), the massage therapist will begin long, firm strokes along the back, neck, shoulders, arms, and then down to lower back and legs. Halfway through the session the client will be asked to turn over, receiving the second half of the massage with the face up (or supine position) for the treatment of upper shoulders, chest, arms, and fronts of the legs.
No one really knows how a painful massage can also feel so good at the same time. This is a sensory phenomenon mostly beyond the reach of science — not entirely14 — all we can do is speculate. A main question is whether good pain is good because we expect relief to follow pain, or because positive and negative qualities are being produced simultaneously. My bet is on the latter.
Facts get confused when we talk about deep pressure. “Deep pressure” is just what it sounds like: it is any type of massage therapy that is performed with more, or deeper, pressure. For example, I can perform a Swedish massage, (that is primarily used to relax the client) and use a heavier hand to take it from a light touch to a “medium” or “firm” touch. This fits most people but since every client is different and every therapist is different, it’s tough to really measure. Therefore, your therapist should manipulate your tissue and adjust their pressure until it is perfect for you. It is very important to ALWAYS speak up and let your therapist know if you need the pressure to be corrected, (i.e. if you need them to lighten up because it is too deep, or to apply more because it is not deep enough). Most everyone needs more pressure in some areas and less in others. This occurs because muscle tissue that contains Trigger Points is more sensitive to pressure and can be tender to the touch.

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Some of the scientific research on massage therapy can be conflicting, but much of the evidence points toward beneficial effects on pain and other symptoms associated with a number of different conditions. Much of the evidence suggests that these effects are short-term, and people should keep getting massages for the benefits to continue. Researchers have studied the effects of massage for many conditions. Some that have been studied more extensively are blood pressure, general pain, cancer, mental health, fibromyalgia, headaches, HIV/AIDS, infant care, autism, anxiety, and diabetes. Massage therapy appears to have few risks if it is used appropriately and provided by a trained massage professional.
Whether you’re an athlete with a daily high demand placed on your body or recovering from an injury or illness, deep tissue massage likely has some benefits to offer you. Massages have been utilized for thousands of years throughout the world to lower both physical and psychological stress. And today, research continues to show that whether used alone or in conjunction with other treatments, massage therapy is an effective way to help treat common conditions like arthritis, anxiety and chronic lower back pain.
Lomilomi is the traditional massage of Hawaii. As an indigenous practice, it varies by island and by family. The word lomilomi also is used for massage in Samoa and East Futuna. In Samoa, it is also known as lolomi and milimili. In East Futuna, it is also called milimili, fakasolosolo, amoamo, lusilusi, kinikini, fai’ua. The Māori call it romiromi and mirimiri. In Tonga massage is fotofota, tolotolo, and amoamo. In Tahiti it is rumirumi. On Nanumea in Tuvalu, massage is known as popo, pressure application is kukumi, and heat application is tutu. Massage has also been documented in Tikopia in the Solomon Islands, in Rarotonga and in Pukapuka in Western Samoa.[46]

When most people think of massage, they think of Swedish. The style takes its name from a 19th-century Swedish physiologist, Per Henrik Ling, whose system of medical gymnastics included massage. Johan Georg Mezger (1838-1909) coined a reduced set of maneuvers and techniques of Dr. Ling’s system as the “Swedish massage” system. Swedish massage is defined by four or five (somewhat familiar) techniques, which have French names: effleurage (stroking), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (rhythmic choppings), and friction (rubbing). Some therapists now incorporate advanced techniques that have rehabilitating effects and stretches for improving your range of motion. But the ultimate goal is relaxation. As the default Western massage, Swedish massage is extremely popular and is simple, soothing touch therapy.

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